Amy’s Art: Kimono Cat Collection – Meet Ageha The Seijinshiki Cat

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KIMONO CAT PROFILE

Name: Ageha (亜蝶)

Height: 22cm

Gender: Female

Kimono type: Furisode (振り袖)

Occasion: Seijinshiki (成人式) – Coming of Age Ceremony

Time of year/season: January/Winter

Name meaning: Ageha is a type of butterfly in Japanese and it can also be used as a girl’s name. Ageha has butterflies on her kimono – which could also symbolise the metamorphosis of ‘coming of age’.

Her Story: Ageha is dressed up in her furisode kimono and is ready to head off to the Coming of Age Day celebrations. She knows the formalities at the town hall to receive her certificate might be a little tedious, but she’s excited to get photos and celebrate with friends afterwards. It’s going to be a great night on the town where she can buy drinks herself (finally!) with some good old karaoke. Being an adult never felt so easy!


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Ageha and Tama

 

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KIMONO CAT EXPLANATION

1.Furisode (振り袖) – Ageha is wearing a furisode kimono, which is a lined kimono and it literally means ‘swinging sleeves’ because the sleeves are so long. The sleeve length can range from 85cm to 114cm. The furisode is the most formal type of kimono a young, unmarried woman can wear in Japan and it is usually rented or bought by parents for their daughter(s) to wear on the Coming of Age Day.

The Coming of Age Day is a Japanese holiday held every year on the second Monday of January for those that have turned 20 in the past year. The day is to congratulate and celebrate their journey into adulthood and they receive a certificate at their local city office or town hall. The majority of young women get dressed up in furisode for the occasion, while most young men wear suits or sometimes the hakama. Turning 20 in Japan means that you can vote, purchase alcohol and marry without your parents’ permission – so you officially become an adult in the eyes of the law and society.

2.Haneri (半衿) and kasaneeri (重ね衿)- is the type of collar the furisode kimono typically has. The thin green fabric aligning the white collar (haneri) is called the kasaneeri. The green fabric tucked in behind the obi but made to be seen is called the obiage (帯揚).

3. Obijime (帯締め) – The obijime is a thick cord tied around the waist over the obi that helps the obi shape stay together.

4. Ohashori (おはしょり) – When putting on a kimono or yukata, you must always leave a folded portion of fabric hanging out from under the obi.

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5. Obi (帯) – The obi is the long sash tied around the waist and is the focal point of womens’ kimono. It is usually a contrasting colour to the kimono and it can be tied into hundreds of different knots for different occasions. Ageha’s obi is tied into a knot known as the fukura suzume (ふくらすずめ) or ‘chubby sparrow’ knot which is used exclusively for furisode and is commonly used for Coming of Age Day festivities.

6. Zōri (草履) – Zōri are the formal sandals worn with kimono, along with the white one-toed tabi  (足袋) socks. The zōri are typically a matching colour to the obi or kimono.

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The accessories typically worn with the Coming of Age Day festivities include a matching small handbag and the rather iconic fluffy white shawl which looks like a fur scarf.

The furisode kimono and obi is difficult to put on by yourself (although it is possible) and most people don’t know how to do it anymore. A lot of young people rent the kimono at specialised shops where they can get all of the matching accessories, get dressed by professionals and also get their hair and make up done. It is also typical to get professional photos taken at the studio while you are dressed up in your furisode.

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Me wearing my mum’s seijinshiki kimono

Ageha’s kimono was actually inspired by my mum’s furisode kimono which she wore to her seijinshiki when she was 20. It’s an insanely gorgeous  kimono which I have also worn on a number of occasions. The obi knot shown here is an even more complex style than the fukura suzume knot.

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So, did you like meeting Ageha?

Did you learn something new about Japanese culture?

Watch this space for the next lovable feline in my Kimono Cat Collection!


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