Amy’s Art: Kimono Cat Collection – The Making Of Fukunae

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Welcome to the making of the fourth feline from my Kimono Cat Collection! This is where I show you the process and behind-the-scenes of how I made my latest clay creation, the lovely Maiko cat called Fukunae. So, without further ado, let’s begin!

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Preparing the armature

First things first, I always start by making the armature, which is the skeleton of the model. I used 2mm aluminium wire for the main frame and 1mm wire to twist tightly around the arms so when I put clay on later it can grip onto it better.

This cat was going to be without a tail (you’ll see why later) which made things a lot easier for me construction-wise. After twisting the wires into the desired shape, it was time to squish blobs of Apoxie Sculpt around the torso and paws of the cat to make sure the armature would be stable and strong.

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Bulking up at the cat gym

Now it was time for my feline to hit the gym and ‘bulk up’ (with tinfoil, that is). I’ve found with my three other cats that it’s really worth the extra effort and time to shape the body shape you want properly when bulking up the frame (especially the head) because it can make the next sculpting step a lot easier!

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First Sculpey layer after the oven 

After the bulking up, it was time to put on the first layer of Super Sculpey, which in Fukunae’s case was to smooth out all of her limbs and head shape and add ‘fur’ to the bits that wouldn’t be covered by kimono. And then it was off to the oven for the first bake!

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Layer two after oven

Now it was time for layer number two! This stage was more interesting because I could start making the under layers of the typical Maiko’s kimono, including the draping collar and the kimono front she would be holding up.

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Front view of the second layer after oven

I also added hair decorations and the shoes with Apoxie at this point, even though I wasn’t sure if it would survive in the oven (it did brilliantly, just saying).

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Third layer after oven

And then it was time for the final layer – the draping furisode sleeves. I left these until last because I needed the under layers to cure before I could start on these fiddly long sleeves that always got in the way of everything when sculpting!

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Whisker time

So there we have it, after three bakes in the oven, it was finally time to add the whiskers! (These are left until after the baking stages are finished because I am pretty sure they would melt otherwise). The whiskers were made by threading thin nylon thread into Apoxie and letting it cure overnight.

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Back view after oven

Here is the back view of Fukunae after all on the baking stages. She can stand up on her own very elegantly and she is probably the lightest cat I have made so far. (This is a good sign as you want to use as little clay as possible, because the layers have to be thin enough to cure properly and it also saves you more clay for your next projects!).

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All Gesso-ed up and ready to go!

So, after all of the foundations were finished, it was white out time! I painted light coats of Acrylic Gesso over the sculpture and let it dry, which makes it a great canvas to paint on later. After the Gesso, I also did a few coats of white acrylic paint to make sure everything was smooth, even and ready for colour!

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First layers of acrylic

Now, this was where the fun really began! I love painting the sculptures and the kimono pattern I was basing this one on was much easier to paint than Tsubasa’s repetitive pattern, so I had a lot of fun with Fukunae. It was also a joy to do softer spring colours and pastels this time, with some tiny details in the coloured strips. Plus, painting the Maiko hairdo was a different change too!

On a side note, I finally bought myself a cutting mat (the green mat you can see above) and it is a life saver when rolling out clay and measuring and cutting straight lines. (I can see why everyone has them now haha) I highly recommend getting one for yourself from the start!

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Work in progress

I whizzed through all of these stages with Fukunae up until this point so quickly – in under a month, in fact! I was determined not to leave her untouched for weeks on end like my other cats, but unfortunately this super productive streak of mine didn’t last (I wasn’t surprised).

Even now, I have her sitting on my shelf ninety-nine percent finished, so I really need to get that last one percent done and you can all finally meet her finished and fabulous!

 


So, did you like the making of Fukunae?

Watch this space to meet the finished version!


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